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  • Resources

    Logging provides the Cameroon government about 60 million US dollars annually. Despite environmental protections enshrined in law, logging is one of Cameroon's least regulated economies, providing broad incentives to Western logging companies (who make up the majority of the stakeholders in Cameroon's vast forests).

  • Rail yard

    Cameroon's rail system is entirely internal, not connecting with any international lines.

  • Parking lot in a city of pedestrians

    The majority of Cameroonians rely on public transportation or their own feet.

  • Kiosks

    Cell phone credit, cigarettes, sweets, and other small items are sold at street stalls.

  • A tight grip

    Cameroon's first president, Ahmadou Ahidjo, relinquished power in 1982, handing it to Paul Biya, who has consolidated his own grip on power ever since. Substantive political opposition is not tolerated, governmental institutions are highly corrupt, and there is a lack of political and media freedom. Human rights groups report that minorities, homosexuals, and dissidents are subjected to torture in Cameroon's overcrowded prisons system.

  • Baguettes

    The French took control of Cameroon in 1919 by League of Nations mandate. This ended German control of the country following their defeat in World War I. The French integrated the Cameroon economy into their own - and augmented their wealth by maintaining the German practice of forced labor. Cameroonian resistance to colonial dominion reached a peak in the 1950s, when the French outlawed an indigenous political party (whose leader was then assassinated). In 1960, Cameroon won its independence under President Ahmadou Ahidjo. The legacy lives on, as baguettes are sold as game-time snacks at Ahmadou Ahidjo Stadium.

  • Walkway

    Fans navigate a flooded gangway to find their seats at Ahmadou Ahidjo Stadium.

  • Capacity

    Ahmadou Ahidjo Stadium was built in 1972 and can seat about 39,000 people.

  • Entertainer

    A crowd-pleaser at Ahmadou Ahidjo Stadium.

  • Pomp and Fanfare

    The opening of the Cameroon vs Democratic Republic of Congo Africa Cup qualifier match in Yaoundé was marked by a military marching band.

  • Cane

    Fans swarmed the field after Cameroon's defeat of Democratic Republic of Congo, for advancement in the Africa Cup of Nations. Shortly afterwards they were beaten off the green before creeping back on again to summersault, run, and celebrate.

  • Democratic Republic of Congo

    A DRC supporter carries the flag across the opposite gangway to join a small - but loyal - group supporting Cameroon's southern neighbor.

  • Les Lions Indomptables

    The Cameroon National football team - the Indomitable Lions - is one of the most famous on the continent, having won Olympic gold, qualified for the World Cup six times, and won four Africa Cup of Nations championships.

  • Resources

    Logging provides the Cameroon government about 60 million US dollars annually. Despite environmental protections enshrined in law, logging is one of Cameroon's least regulated economies, providing broad incentives to Western logging companies (who make up the majority of the stakeholders in Cameroon's vast forests).

  • Rail yard

    Cameroon's rail system is entirely internal, not connecting with any international lines.

  • Parking lot in a city of pedestrians

    The majority of Cameroonians rely on public transportation or their own feet.

  • Kiosks

    Cell phone credit, cigarettes, sweets, and other small items are sold at street stalls.

  • A tight grip

    Cameroon's first president, Ahmadou Ahidjo, relinquished power in 1982, handing it to Paul Biya, who has consolidated his own grip on power ever since. Substantive political opposition is not tolerated, governmental institutions are highly corrupt, and there is a lack of political and media freedom. Human rights groups report that minorities, homosexuals, and dissidents are subjected to torture in Cameroon's overcrowded prisons system.

  • Baguettes

    The French took control of Cameroon in 1919 by League of Nations mandate. This ended German control of the country following their defeat in World War I. The French integrated the Cameroon economy into their own - and augmented their wealth by maintaining the German practice of forced labor. Cameroonian resistance to colonial dominion reached a peak in the 1950s, when the French outlawed an indigenous political party (whose leader was then assassinated). In 1960, Cameroon won its independence under President Ahmadou Ahidjo. The legacy lives on, as baguettes are sold as game-time snacks at Ahmadou Ahidjo Stadium.

  • Walkway

    Fans navigate a flooded gangway to find their seats at Ahmadou Ahidjo Stadium.

  • Capacity

    Ahmadou Ahidjo Stadium was built in 1972 and can seat about 39,000 people.

  • Entertainer

    A crowd-pleaser at Ahmadou Ahidjo Stadium.

  • Pomp and Fanfare

    The opening of the Cameroon vs Democratic Republic of Congo Africa Cup qualifier match in Yaoundé was marked by a military marching band.

  • Cane

    Fans swarmed the field after Cameroon's defeat of Democratic Republic of Congo, for advancement in the Africa Cup of Nations. Shortly afterwards they were beaten off the green before creeping back on again to summersault, run, and celebrate.

  • Democratic Republic of Congo

    A DRC supporter carries the flag across the opposite gangway to join a small - but loyal - group supporting Cameroon's southern neighbor.

  • Les Lions Indomptables

    The Cameroon National football team - the Indomitable Lions - is one of the most famous on the continent, having won Olympic gold, qualified for the World Cup six times, and won four Africa Cup of Nations championships.

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