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  • Above

    Unguja Island (often just called 'Zanzibar') is Zanzibar's primary landmass, and home to the Islands' capital. Fishing is a source of capital for a number of Zanzibaris not involved in the spice trade or tourism, the islands' two largest industries. Here fishing boats are tied along a beach on the outskirts of the capital.

  • We are the champions

    Stone Town's most famous contemporary personality is Faroukh Bulsara, who was born a few minutes from this courtyard while Zanzibar was still a British protectorate. After schooling in India and London, Faroukh Bulsara sold secondhand clothing in Kensington Market and joined a band. He changed his name to Freddie Mercury, and spent the rest of his life fronting Queen, one of the most popular and flamboyant rock bands of all time, before dying of AIDS in 1991. Zanzibar lays uneasy claim to Freddie Mercury, particularly in light of a majority Muslim population that shuns homosexuality. In the west Freddie Mercury is still very much present, and London's West End continues to perform the Queen inspired musical, We Will Rock You.

  • Caged

    Eastern Zanzibar

  • Flight

    Stone town breakwall, Thursday afternoon.

  • Dry dock

    A fishing boat is pulled ashore in Stone Town.

  • Bounty

    Freshly caught fish and a ray hang from a papaya trunk at a construction site along a eastern Zanzibar beach.

  • Bounty

    Extreme tides allow seaweed and red algae to be easily harvested, and large aquaculture beds are exposed when the water recedes.

  • Football

    Stone Town

  • Pedestrians

    Sunset on a Stone Town beach.

  • Flames

    Stone Town beach, sunset, Thursday.

  • Stone Town

    Beach walk

  • Kilimanjaro

    Zanzibar is accessible from a handful of east African airports, including Kilimanjaro, and a number of its European tourists include the island as part of a larger regional package.

  • Midnight

    Long exposure, Pongwe Beach, eastern Zanzibar Island.

  • Reflection

    Moonrise over the Indian Ocean at Pongwe, eastern Zanzibar.

  • Stone

    Captives from the continent were chained to a tree for display in the large courtyard of the Stone Town slave market. This was the world's last open slave market, closed by decree by the Sultan of Zanzibar in 1873 after an appeal by Dr. David Livingstone (of 'I presume' fame) to 'the men of the great English universities of Oxford and Cambridge to liberate Africa from the slave trade'. The Crown put increasing pressure on the practice, until the Sultan shifted the Zanzibar economy towards spice trading. Slaving continued for decades, however, through a black market that took advantage of Zanzibar's hidden caves and coral formations as clandestine 'holding sites' for human cargo. A memorial now stands on the site, making use of the original chains used by the slavers.

  • Octopus

    'Hey! You are from Kenya?' a fisherman asked me in the Stone Town market, after a few sparse words of Swahili. 'My name is Octopus! I am a fisherman and you can find me here... unless it is the middle of the night, then you can find me in the sea!'

  • Coral Caves

    Massive caves extend for great distances beneath the surface near Kiwengwa, on Unguja Island. The damp caverns are home to bats, lizards, and a number of large (and formidable) insects.

  • Bury the chains

    Slave 'quarters' in the bowels of one of the primary remaining structures still standing at Stone Town's slave market. African captives were held here before auction, separated by languages to avoid the ability to communicate with one-another.

  • Murder of Crows

    Crows flock along the roadside in eastern Zanzibar, just north of Pongwe town.

  • Graffiti

    Illustrations along a break wall on a Stone Town beach. Below it, written in the sand was the following: 'Je t'aime plus que j'aime ma vie'.

  • Bushbaby

    Bushbabies are small nocturnal primates that are named for their nighttime wailing. Bushbabies have unique tendons in their lower legs, allowing them to jump extreme distances and great heights - much more than any animal near their size.

  • Foliage

    Zanzibar's thick vegetation is a product of fertile land and favorable climate. This combination has made it one of the premier spice growing islands in the world, and its nutmeg, cloves, pepper, and cinnamon are globally famous. Spice plantations continue to operate and tours happen daily.

  • Into the fog

    Ferry service connects Unguja Island with Pemba Island and ports along the mainland coast - primarily Dar es Salaam. The Zanzibar ferries made worldwide headlines in 2011, after nearly 200 people died and hundreds more were rescued when an overloaded vessel capsized.

  • Above

    Unguja Island (often just called 'Zanzibar') is Zanzibar's primary landmass, and home to the Islands' capital. Fishing is a source of capital for a number of Zanzibaris not involved in the spice trade or tourism, the islands' two largest industries. Here fishing boats are tied along a beach on the outskirts of the capital.

  • We are the champions

    Stone Town's most famous contemporary personality is Faroukh Bulsara, who was born a few minutes from this courtyard while Zanzibar was still a British protectorate. After schooling in India and London, Faroukh Bulsara sold secondhand clothing in Kensington Market and joined a band. He changed his name to Freddie Mercury, and spent the rest of his life fronting Queen, one of the most popular and flamboyant rock bands of all time, before dying of AIDS in 1991. Zanzibar lays uneasy claim to Freddie Mercury, particularly in light of a majority Muslim population that shuns homosexuality. In the west Freddie Mercury is still very much present, and London's West End continues to perform the Queen inspired musical, We Will Rock You.

  • Caged

    Eastern Zanzibar

  • Flight

    Stone town breakwall, Thursday afternoon.

  • Dry dock

    A fishing boat is pulled ashore in Stone Town.

  • Bounty

    Freshly caught fish and a ray hang from a papaya trunk at a construction site along a eastern Zanzibar beach.

  • Bounty

    Extreme tides allow seaweed and red algae to be easily harvested, and large aquaculture beds are exposed when the water recedes.

  • Football

    Stone Town

  • Pedestrians

    Sunset on a Stone Town beach.

  • Flames

    Stone Town beach, sunset, Thursday.

  • Stone Town

    Beach walk

  • Kilimanjaro

    Zanzibar is accessible from a handful of east African airports, including Kilimanjaro, and a number of its European tourists include the island as part of a larger regional package.

  • Midnight

    Long exposure, Pongwe Beach, eastern Zanzibar Island.

  • Reflection

    Moonrise over the Indian Ocean at Pongwe, eastern Zanzibar.

  • Stone

    Captives from the continent were chained to a tree for display in the large courtyard of the Stone Town slave market. This was the world's last open slave market, closed by decree by the Sultan of Zanzibar in 1873 after an appeal by Dr. David Livingstone (of 'I presume' fame) to 'the men of the great English universities of Oxford and Cambridge to liberate Africa from the slave trade'. The Crown put increasing pressure on the practice, until the Sultan shifted the Zanzibar economy towards spice trading. Slaving continued for decades, however, through a black market that took advantage of Zanzibar's hidden caves and coral formations as clandestine 'holding sites' for human cargo. A memorial now stands on the site, making use of the original chains used by the slavers.

  • Octopus

    'Hey! You are from Kenya?' a fisherman asked me in the Stone Town market, after a few sparse words of Swahili. 'My name is Octopus! I am a fisherman and you can find me here... unless it is the middle of the night, then you can find me in the sea!'

  • Coral Caves

    Massive caves extend for great distances beneath the surface near Kiwengwa, on Unguja Island. The damp caverns are home to bats, lizards, and a number of large (and formidable) insects.

  • Bury the chains

    Slave 'quarters' in the bowels of one of the primary remaining structures still standing at Stone Town's slave market. African captives were held here before auction, separated by languages to avoid the ability to communicate with one-another.

  • Murder of Crows

    Crows flock along the roadside in eastern Zanzibar, just north of Pongwe town.

  • Graffiti

    Illustrations along a break wall on a Stone Town beach. Below it, written in the sand was the following: 'Je t'aime plus que j'aime ma vie'.

  • Bushbaby

    Bushbabies are small nocturnal primates that are named for their nighttime wailing. Bushbabies have unique tendons in their lower legs, allowing them to jump extreme distances and great heights - much more than any animal near their size.

  • Foliage

    Zanzibar's thick vegetation is a product of fertile land and favorable climate. This combination has made it one of the premier spice growing islands in the world, and its nutmeg, cloves, pepper, and cinnamon are globally famous. Spice plantations continue to operate and tours happen daily.

  • Into the fog

    Ferry service connects Unguja Island with Pemba Island and ports along the mainland coast - primarily Dar es Salaam. The Zanzibar ferries made worldwide headlines in 2011, after nearly 200 people died and hundreds more were rescued when an overloaded vessel capsized.

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